MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FISHERIES AND AQUACULTURE DEGREE PROGRAMME

Core courses

Course code

Course Title

Units

AF 601

Advanced Aquatic Ecology

3

AF 602

Fisheries Socio-economics and Management

3

AF 603

Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment

3

AF 604

Advanced Aquaculture Systems

3

AF 605

Fish Nutrition and Feed Technology

3

AF 606

Aquafarm Planning and Management

3

AF 607

Fish Health Protection

2

AF 608

Broodstock Management and Hatchery Production

3

AF 609

Post Harvest Technology in Fisheries

3

AF 699

Dissertation

12

 

Total number of Core Units

38

 

Elective courses

Course code

Course Title

Units

AF 610

Fish Physiology and Endocrinology

2

AF 611

Environmental Impact of Aquaculture and Capture Fisheries

3

AF 612

Systematic Ichthyology

2

AF 613

Ecology and Behaviour of Fishes

2

AF 614

Recreational and Ornamental Fisheries

2

AF 615

Aquatic Resources and Biodiversity Management

2

BL 607

Biostatistics

3

BT 603

Seaweed Culture and Processing

3

SC 601

Advanced Research Methods

3

 

Total number of Elective Units

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4b: Semester mapping for the Master of Science in Fisheries and Aquaculture

 

Year

Semester

Course title

Units

Total

 

 

Core courses

 

 

 

 

AF 601: Advanced Aquatic Ecology

3

 

 

 

AF 602: Fisheries Socio-economics and Management

3

12

1

I

AF 603: Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment

3

 

 

 

AF 604: Advanced Aquaculture Systems

3

 

 

 

Optional courses (minimum 5 units)

 

 

 

 

AF 612: Systematic Ichthyology

2

 

 

 

AF613: Ecology and Behaviour of Fishes

2

12

 

 

AF 614: Recreational and Ornamental Fisheries

2

 

 

 

BL 607: Biostatistics

3

 

 

 

BT 603: Seaweed Culture and Processing

3

 

 

 

Core courses

 

 

 

 

AF 605: Fish Nutrition and Feed Technology

3

 

 

 

AF 606: Aquafarm Planning and Management

3

 

 

II

AF 607: Fish Health Protection

2

14

 

 

AF 608: Broodstock Management and Hatchery Production

3

 

 

 

AF 609: Post Harvest Technology in Fisheries

3

 

 

 

Optional courses (minimum 5 units)

 

 

 

 

AF 610: Fish Physiology and Endocrinology

2

 

 

 

AF 611:Environmental Impact of Aquaculture and Capture Fisheries

3

 

 

 

AF 615: Aquatic Resources and Biodiversity Management

2

10

 

 

SC 601: Advanced Research Methods

3

 

2

 

AF 699: Dissertation

12

 

 

References

  1. United Republic of Tanzania (2001). National report on the implementation of the convention on Biological Diversity.
  2. Julius A. (2005). Monitoring programme for resource condition, environmental and biological parameters from Mnazi Bay - Ruvuma Estuary Marine Park (MBREMP) Tanzania. Final Report on Fisheries Training Programme, United Nations University, Iceland.
  3. Budget Speech by Hon John Pombe Magufuli (2008/2009). Minister of Livestock Development and Fisheries.
  4. FAST (2002). Bachelor of Science Degree Programme in Fisheries Science and Aquaculture.
  5. UDSM (2004). UDSM Ten Years Experience of the Institutional Transformation Programme (ITP), Institute of Kiswahili Research.
  6. United Republic of Tanzania (1999). The Tanzania Development Vision 2025, Planning Commission.
  7. United Republic of Tanzania (2000). Poverty Reduction Strategy Programme (PRSP), Vice President's Office.
  8. United Republic of Tanzania (1996). The National Science and Technology Policy for Tanzania, Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education.
  9. United Republic of Tanzania (1994). The National Training Policy, Ministry of Education and Culture.
  10. United Republic of Tanzania (2010). Higher Education Development Programme 2010-2015. Ministry of Education and Vocational training, Dar es Salaam.
  11. United Republic of Tanzania (2005). National Strategy for Growth and Reduction of Poverty, Vice President Office.
  12. CoNAS (2011). Tracer and needs assessments for Postgraduate Programmes.

 


APPENDIX 1: SYNOPSES, TEXTBOOKS, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT

 

AF 601: Advanced Aquatic Ecology(3 Units)

 

Course description

 

This course provides knowledge on current theories and models of aquatic ecosystems, the relation between watershed, atmosphere, lakes and streams, interactions between humankind and aquatic ecosystems, and water management. Students are also introduced to simulation modelling and ecological applications that can offer solutions to complex management problems of water resources, including marine and freshwater resources.

 

Learning outcomes:

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • describe dynamical abiotic processes in aquatic systems;
  • describe biological processes and interactions in aquatic systems;
  • apply simple models to describe selected processes in aquatic systems;
  • understand and apply the principles of Aquatic Ecology including the dynamic;

processes that affect organisms in aquatic ecosystems;

  • integrate the perspectives and knowledge of Aquatic Ecology with those of other

disciplines to analyse a specific problem and contribute to the development of

sustainable water resources management.

 

Course content

 

Aquatic environment: Wetland, temporary waters, lakes, rivers; coastal and marine habitats. Limnology; Physical and chemical oceanography; Characterization of stream and river ecosystems from a watershed perspective.Fundamental processes affecting the structure and dynamics of aquatic communities and the riparian zones; Tropical models for aquatic ecosystems, Eutrophication.

 

Delivery:30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

1)      Barnes, R.S.K. and K H Mann 1992. Fundamentals of Aquatic Ecology, Second Edition, Wiley, 280 pp.

2)      Keddy, P.A. 2000. Wetland Ecology: Principles and Conservation. Cambridge University Press, 628 pp.

3)      McClintock, J.B. and Baker, B.J. 2001. Marine Chemical Ecology (Marine Science) CRC; 1 edition, 624 pp.

4)      Nagelkerken, I. (Editor) (2009). Ecological Connectivity among Tropical Coastal Ecosystems. Springer, London.

 

 

 

AF 602: Fisheries Socio-economics and Management(3 Units)

 

Course description: This course is designed to prepare students to understand fisheries, its development and management from a social science standpoint. The course exposes students to the socio anthropological and economic characteristics of fishing communities as well as theoretical issues in the sociology of fisheries management and development.

 

Expected learning outcomes

 

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

 

  • Understand sociological and anthropological aspects of fisheries management and development.
  • Acquire knowledge to integrate sociological theories related to fishing communities with economic and biological reasoning.
  • Competence to present how socio-economic and anthropological theories are used in understanding selected fisheries, both nationally controlled and those in which two or more countries are involved.

 

Course content: Theoretical issues in the sociology of fisheries, fisheries exploitation, management and development.The course begins from the tragedy of the commons then discusses the experiences of both marine and freshwater fisheries management, with a particular focus on solutions like Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and co-management. This is extended to the economist view of fisheries management, the dominant economic paradigms with regards to fisheries management. The course also discusses property rights, poverty in fishing communities, governance and governance of rights and Methodological approaches to the study of fishing communities. Fisheries management.

 

Delivery: 30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%, examination 50%.

 

References

1)      Anderson, L. G. (2004). The Economics of Fisheries Management. The Blackburn Press, New Jersey. pp 296

2)      Charles, A. T. and Parzival, C. (2004) Fisheries Socio-Economics. 288 pp.

3)      Chuenpagdee, R (2011). World Small-scale Fisheries Contemporary Visions. Eburon. Delft pp 400

4)      Hersoug B., Jentoft S.andDegnbol P. (2004). Fisheries Development: The Institutional Challenge. Eburon. Delft. pp 228

5)      Jentoft, S and Eide A. (Eds) (2011) Poverty Mosaics: Realities and Prospects in Small-scale Fisheries. Springer, Dordrecht. pp 510

6)      King, M. (2007). Fisheries Biology, Assessment and Management. Second Edition. Blackwell Publishing, UK.

 

 

 

AF 603: Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment(3 Units)

 

Course description

 

This course is designed to cover theoretical aspects o population dynamics and stock assessment. The course focuses on the use of standard mathematics models in estimating fish population sizes, recruitment, production and yield. Students also will use FAST (Fishery Analyses and Simulation Tools) to predict yield and catch composition for recreational and commercial fisheries in different water bodies.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Perform data analysis, interpretation of results and errors in fish stock assessment.
  • Apply modelling techniques to assess exploited fish populations.
  • Apply modern techniques in fish stock assessment to estimate population abundance.

 

Course content

 

Overview of fish population dynamics. Models used in fish population dynamics. Growth in fishes and fitting of growth curves. Mortality and survival rates in fishes (the exponential decay model). Stock recruitment and types of recruitment. Equilibrium and stock size predictive models surplus production models and their application in fisheries management. Virtual population Analysis and cohort analysis. Application of VPA and cohort analysis to fisheries management.Gear selection and its use in fisheries management.Fish population tracking.

 

Estimating of stock size by exploratory fishing surveys. Area, timing and precision of survey estimates. Sampling strategies. Standardization of sampling gear, estimation of trawling stations, timing and duration. Swept area method.Cruise programs and report.Estimation of stock size from biological data mark and recapture method, primary production, zooplankton abundance, maturity stages, age/size frequency analysis. Fish and larval surveys: design, procedure and field operations. Estimation of stock size from commercial catches/fisheries: biological data, fishing gear and fishing operations, frame surveys and computation of effort, fisheries statistics by stratification, fisheries database: establishment, status and their significance. Estimation of stock size by acoustic surveys: equipment characteristics, principles, data analysis, interpretation of results and errors. Application of computers in fish stock assessment. Decision making process.

 

Delivery: 30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Cadima, E.L. (2007). Fish Stock Assessment Manual. Daya Publishing House.

data. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.

  1. Gallucci, V.F., Saila, S.B. Gustafson, D.J. and Rothschild, B.J. (1995). Stock Assessment: Quantitative Methods and Applications for Small Scale Fisheries. CRC.
  2. Gulland, J. (1983). Fish stock assessment: a manual of basic methods. Wiley, Chichester (UK).
  3. Gulland, J.A. (1988). Fish Population Dynamics: The Implications for Management. A Wiley-Interscience publication.
  4. Guy, C.S. and M.L. Brown. 2007. Analysis and interpretation of freshwater fisheries
  5. Haddon, M. 2001. Modeling and quantitative methods in fisheries. Chapman and

Hall/CRC Press, Washington, D.C.

  1. Hilborn, R. and Walters, C.J. (1991). Quantitative Fisheries Stock Assessment - Choice, Dynamics and Uncertainty. Springer.
  2. King, M. (2007). Fisheries Biology, Assessment and Management. Second Edition. Blackwell Publishing, UK.
  3. Quinn, T.J. and Deriso, R.B. (1999). Quantitative fish dynamics. Biological Resource Management Series. Oxford University Press.

 

 

AF 604: Advanced Aquaculture Systems(3 Units)

 

Course description

 

The Advanced Aquaculture Systems programme aims to provide appropriate and flexible learning opportunities through which students can acquire and further develop the knowledge and skills necessary to establish, manage and appraise aquaculture enterprises and systems. This would be of particular interest to someone wanting to pursue a career in aquaculture facility management and appraisal.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Understand and apply basic engineering concepts in key production systems
  • Specify conditions for development of pond and tank based systems
  • Make an outline design for intensive and recycle systems
  • Specify and provide outline design for a floating aquaculture system
  • Make an outline design of water/waste treatment facilities for given objectives
  • To apply selected concepts to a design topic of their own choice

 

Course content

 

The anatomical, physiological and developmental adaptations of selected farmed fish and shellfish species in various aquaculture systems. Site Selection: marketing to environmental considerations, intensive aquaculture systems; the elements and functioning of ponds, raceway, cages and recirculating tank systems, engineering and construction of aquaculture facilities, Water supply and waste water management, determinants and limitations of systems and species, cost-benefit of selected aquaculture systems, design issues in developing aquaculture systems for optimal performance and waste management.

 

Delivery:30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment:Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

 

References

  1. Avault, J. 1996. Fundamentals of Aquaculture. AVA Publishing Co, Baton Rouge, LA.
  2. Bostick, K., Clay, J.W. and McNevin, A. (2005). Aquaculture and the Environment. A WWF Handbook on Production Practices Impacts, and Markets. WWF, USA.
  3. Huguenin, J.E. and Colt, J., (1989). Design and Operating Guide for Aquaculture Seawater Systems. Development in Aquaculture and Fisheries Science, Vol. 20, Amsterdam, Elsevier.
  4. Petit, J. 1990. Water supply, treatment, and recycling in aquaculture, pp. 63-196 in G. Barnabe, ed., Aquaculture Volume 1. Ellis Horwood Limited, Chichester, England.
  5. Pillay, T.V.R. and Kutty, M.N. (2003). Aquaculture: Principles and Practices. Wiley-Blackwell.
  6. Shepherd, C.J. and Bromage, N.R. (1992). Intensive Fish Farming. Wiley-Blackwell.
  7. USDA-NRCS, 1997. Ponds - planning, design, construction. United States Department of Agriculture Natural resources Conservation Service Agriculture Handbook Number 590, Washington, DC.

 

 

AF 605: Fish Nutrition and Feed Technology (3 Units)

 

Course description

This course covers metabolism and nutritional requirements of fishes and other aquatic animals. The course is also designed to help students understand important aspects of fish feeds and how to formulate feed for both fry and adults. Aquaculture requires knowledge of fish feed in order to best maximise the production. In this course students are expected to learn how to produce different types of fish feeds as well as identifying fish feed requirements.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Describes principal types of artificial feed and their ingredients
  • Determine chemical composition and nutritional profiles of local feed ingredients
  • Describe manufacturer techniques for various types of fish feeds and be able to produce them.
  • Design and operate various types of feed mills.
  • Identify fish feed requirements and formulate and produce feeds.

 

Course content

 

Fish nutrition: Digestion in fishes: anatomy and physiology of the gut, specific dynamic action (SDA), enzymes and secretions.Energy metabolism in fishes: energy flow, losses and sources, requirements, distribution and factors affecting energy needs. Proteins and amino acid: Classification, properties, digestion metabolism. Gross, qualitative and quantitative requirements of proteins. Essential and non-essential amino acids and protein quality. Amino acid supplements. Lipids and fatty acids: sources and their effects on diets. Body composition of lipids and fatty acids and requirements. Lipids and fatty acids requirements. Poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Essential fatty acids (EFA). Fatty acid metabolism in fishes. C carbohydrates: classification, chemistry, metabolism, digestion and storage. Vitamins: functions, requirements, sources and protection, deficiency syndrome and assessment of levels in fish. Practical fish diets. Wet diets for research. Methods of measurements and analysis for digestion studies. Experimental design in diet studies.Factors affecting digestion in fishes.

 

Aquaculture feed technology: Fish feedstuffs classification processing, nutrient profiles: fish feed formulation techniques and practice, including use of local ingredients, least-cost computerized diets. Manufacture techniques for various types of fish feeds: wet, semi-moist, frozen, extruded, expanded, rolled, pelleted and microparticulate or microencapsulated diets.Design and operation of various type of feed mills. Enrichment of feeds, live feeds. Principles of aquaculture nutrition and feed formulation. Nutritional energetics. Nutrient requirements. Essential nutrients. Digestion and absorption. Metabolism and somatic growth. Feed efficiency. Diet formulation. Diet quality. Alternative feeds. Aquaculture feed technology.

 

Delivery: 30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. De Silva, S.S. and Anderson, T.A. (1998) Fish nutrition in aquaculture. Chapman & Hall. London.
  2. Guillaume, J., Kaushik, S., Bergot, P. and, Metailler, R. (2001) Nutrition and feeding of fish and crustaceans. Springer.
  3. Hertrampf, J.W. and Piedad-Pascual, F. (2000) Handbook on ingredients for aquaculture feeds. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston.
  4. Jansman, A.J.M. (1995) Fish feeds formulation and technology.
  5. Jauncey, K. (1998) Tilapia feeds and feeding. Pisces Press Ltd. Stirling, Scotland.
  6. Lovell, T. (1989) Nutrition and feeding of fish. Van Nostrand Reinhold. New York.
  7. Lovell, T. (1998) Nutrition and feeding of fish. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  8. National Research Council. (1983) Nutrients requirements of warm water fishes and shellfishes. National Academy Press, Washington D.C.
  9. Tacon, A.G.J. (1990) Feeding practices. Standard methods for the nutrition and feeding of farmed fish and shrimps. Vol. 3. Argent Laboratories Press. Redmond, Washington.
  10. Wilson, R.P. (1991) Handbook of nutrient requirements of finfish. Boca Raton, Florida, CRC Press.

 

 

AF 606: Aquafarm Planning and Management (3 Units)

 

Course description

This course prepares students as future planners and managers of fish farms. The course concentrates on fundamentals and importance of planning and management, needed skills, human relations and marketing understanding of the different aquaculture systems as well as their economic potentials and legal provisions.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Plan and manage an aquaculture farm.
  • Identify management considerations in planning an aquabusiness
  • Describe functions in the management process
  • Explain important skills of managers
  • Describe the importance of human relations.
  • Describe the legal provisions and policy framework for aquaculture.
  • Assess biological attributes for successful aquaculture undertaking.
  • Explain the economic potential of aquaculture farms their rate of return and payback.
  • Train other personnel aspects of aquafarm production.
  • Explain all aspects of fisheries socio-economics and be able to identify their impacts.
  • Describe the marketing systems for aquaculture products.

 

Course content

 

Detailed evaluation of the biologic, economic and legal feasibility of raising an aquaculture species. Economic feasibility: demand, finance, production and marketing. Infrastructure, investments, rate of return, payback period. Costs and benefits analysis systems costs, production costs and processing costs. Biological feasibility: water supply quality and quantity, reproductive biology, nutrition, and diseases. Legal feasibility: compliance to landuse laws, access laws, water-use laws, environmental laws and policies, health and safety laws, permits and procedures. Data analysis in planning (computer simulations.)Resources management in Aquaculture. Fish stock management. Management of Aquaculture systems. Training of personnel. Research support and extension services.

 

Delivery: 30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. G.E. Turner (ed.): Codes of Practice and Manual of Procedures for Consideration of Introductions and Transfers of Marine and Freshwater Organisms, EIFAC Occasional Paper No. 23, FAO, Rome, Italy, 1988.
  2. GESAMP (IMO/FAO/UNESCO-IOC/WMO/IEA/UN/UNEP Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection): Planning and management for sustainable coastal aquaculture development. Rep. Stud. GESAMP, (68):90 p., 2001
  3. Nash, C.E. (1995) Aquaculture Sector Planning and Management. Fishing News Books Ltd.
  4. Pillay, T.V.R. and Kutty, M.N. (2005) Aquaculture: Principles and Practices. Blackwell Publishing.

 

 

AF 607: Fish Health Protection(2 Units)

 

Course description

Fish diseases are a major factor governing the management of capture fisheries and diseases also have significant impact on commercial aquaculture. In this course students will learn disease diagnostic techniques, survey the major diseases of wild and cultured fish, and learn about the relationships between fish disease and regulatory actions. Important topics such as fish immunization and vaccination are also covered.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Recognize important parasitic pathogens
  • Recognize the general clinical signs of diseases caused by broad groups of pathogens
  • Determine a correct diagnosis and appropriate method or disease management or treatment
  • Be able to prevent disease occurrences through certification and biosecurity

 

Course content

 

Diseases of cultured fish: a general account of incidence of infections and non-infections and their control; diseases caused by protozoan parasites (flagellates, rhizopoda, sporozoans and ciliates) and methods of their control; diseases caused by helminth parasites (trematodes, cestodes and nematodes) and methods of their control; acanthocephala infection in fish and treatment of diseased specimens; pathogenic crustacea and methods of their control. Pathology-infections diseases of fish: emphasis on bacterial and viral pathogens, diagnostic procedures and equipment (microscopes, tissue culture, histology, PCR, microbiology), control strategies, external and internal structures of fish, their function and importance, immunity and defense in fish.

 

Delivery: 15 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Bondad-Reantaso MG, Subasinghe RP, Arthur JR, Ogawa K, Chinabut S, Adlard R, Tan Z, Shariff M., 2005. Disease and health management in Asian aquaculture. Veterinary Parasitology. 30; 132(3-4):249-72.

2.      Noga, E.J. 2010. Fish Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment (second edition). Willey-Blackwell. 536 pp

  1. Plumb, J.A. and Hanson, L.A., 2010. Health Maintenance and Principal Microbial Diseases of Cultured Fishes. Willey-Blackwell
  2. Smith, P., 2008. Antimicrobial resistance in aquaculture. In: Bernoth E.-M. (ed.), Changing trends in managing aquatic animal disease emergencies. Rev. Sci. Tech. Off. Int. Epiz., 27, p. 243-264.

 

 

AF 608: Broodstock Management and Hatchery Production (3 Units)

 

Course description

The course introduces students on how to obtain and maintain broodstock from the wild without compromising the genetic constitution of the stocks. Students are provided with tools to understand and evaluate the use of genetic approaches for fisheries management and aquaculture. The course also presents an integration of the concepts of basic biology of aquaculture species and hatchery techniques. Students are expected to develop a skill set that can be applied to the development of new hatchery protocols adapted from active areas of aquaculture research.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Understand how a range of genetic and reproductive techniques can be integrated in managing hatchery populations of a range of aquaculture species
  • Use genetic approaches to provide fisheries and aquaculture management solutions.
  • To describe the infrastructures needed for effective hatchery operation
  • Design, operate and maintain a fish hatchery facility.
  • Developed, as part of a small group, a plan for the management of a hatchery population of a particular species
  • Appreciate how the biology and culture of different species influences hatchery management
  • Describe common problems in fish seed production and their management

 

Course content

Broodstock management: The importance of breeding and genetic selection in knowledge-based aquaculture development. The application of genetic principles in aquaculture, basic cyto-genetic processes in development of gametes, broodstock management, breeding cycle, induced breeding, hybridization, inbreeding problems, egg quality and gamete preservation. .Common problems in fish seed production and their management. Cryo-preservation and genetic manipulation in fishes. Deployment of biotechnology tools in responsible aquaculture.

 

Hatchery production: design of and site selection for fish hatcheries, infrastructures needed for effective hatchery operation. Water supply, water storage and distribution, water recirculation and reconditioning facilities; operation and maintenance of hatcheries; technology of larval and early fry rearing, production of live foods brood stock management, spawning and seed production; handling, feeding and rearing of larval stages and grow-outs, and harvesting. Transport of fish seeds and broodstock. 

 

Delivery: 30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

 

1)      Gary A. Wedemeyer (2002). Fish Hatchery Management. Second Edition. American Fisheries Society. 751pp.

2)      Lucac, J.S. and Southgate, P.C. (2003). Aquaculture: Farming of Aquatic Animals and Plants. Blackwell Publishing, UK.

3)      Niall R. Bromage, Ronald J. Roberts (1991). Broodstock Management and Egg and Larva quality. Wiley-Blackwell. 432pp.

 

 

AF 609: Post Harvest Technology in Fisheries (3 Units)

 

Course description

Post harvest loss is a great problem to fisheries that has often caused great losses of income to fishermen. This course teaches students post harvest technology as well as handling, preservation, processing and control of fish quality.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Use fish post harvest technology in fisheries.
  • Perform the handling, preservation, processing and control of fish quality.
  • Describe methods of quality control and processing of fish.

 

Course content

Review of structure of fish muscle. Biochemical composition of fish muscle and factors affecting them.  Causes of fish spoilage. Post mortem changes in fish. Basic principles on the bacterial and fungal activities on the food and principles of controlling them. Processing and preservation techniques of fish - Freezing, canning and curing. Physical, chemical, laboratory, microbiological and sensory evaluation techniques of assessing fish spoilage and storage length. Quality control. Guidelines and standardization of fish products. Post harvest fish handling and processing.Fishery product technology:Fish meal, meal, Fish oil,Fish protein concentrate (FPC), Fishery by products, Manufacture of fish ham, sausage, fish paste, fish finger s and sticks, fish balls, fish pickles and sauce Quality control in fish processing industry.

 

Delivery:30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Anon, (1979) Handling, Processing and Marketing of Tropical Fish. Tropical
  2. Burges, G.H.O. Cutting, C.L. Lovern, J.A. and Waterman, J.J. (1965) Fish Handling and Processing Her majesty's Stationery Office, Edinburgh.
  3. Chandran, K.K. (2000) Post Harvest Technology of Fish and Fish Products. Daya Publishing House, New Delhi.
  4. Clucas, I.J. and Ward, A.R. (1996) Post-harvest fisheries development: a guide to handling, preservation, processing and quality. NRI Chatham (United Kingdom.
  5. Company Private Ltd.
  6. Govindan, T.K. (1985) Fish Processing Technology. Oxford and IBH publishing
  7. Kreuzer, R. (1965) Freezing and Irradiation of Fish. Fishing news (Books) Ltd., London.
  8. Kreuzer, R. (1965) The Technology of Fish Utilisation. Fishing News (Books) Ltd., London.
  9. Kreuzer, R. (1974) Fishery Products. FAO Fishing News (Books) Ltd., England.

Pillay, T.V.R. (1972) Coastal Products Institute London.

 

 

 

 

AF 699: Dissertation(12 Units)

 

Course description

Dissertation is the most important part of the masters degree programme. The dissertation is expected to impart knowledge to the students through original thinking, creativity and carrying out independent research work. This is expected to create a solid research background to the students.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Conduct independent research project with minimum supervision.
  • Perform data analysis, interpretation and write a report or dissertation.
  • Design a research project and write a concept note.

 

Course content

At the beginning of the first semester, each student shall be assigned an academic advisor by the departmental graduate studies committee drawn from among the staff constituting the faculty. The student shall be assigned a dissertation supervisor by the department just before proposal writing in the second semester.

 

Delivery: A laboratory or field study of a problem or any basic research topic in a selected field of fisheries or aquaculture leading to the preparation of a dissertation.

Assessment: Equivalent of 12 units of core courses and will be graded.

 

References

  1. Kothari, C.R. 1997. Research Methodology. Methods and Techniques. 2nd Edition. Wishwa Prakashan Publishers, pp. 887. ISBN 81-7328-036-3.
  2. Scheiner, S.M. and J. Gurevitch. 1993. Design and analysis of ecological experiments. Chapman and Hall, New York.
  3. Sokal, R.R. and J.F. Rohlf 1995. Biometry. The principles and practice of statistics in Biological research. 3rd Edition. W.H. Freeman and Company. New York, pp. 887. ISBN 0 7167 2411 1.
  4. Zar, J.H. 1984. Biostatistical analysis. 2nd Edition. Prentice-Hall International Inc., pp. 718. ISBN 0 13 077595 9 01.
  5. Bailey, N.T. 1981. Statistical Methods in Biology. 2nd Edition. Edward Arnold, London.

 


ELECTIVE COURSES:

 

AF 610: Fish Physiology and Endocrinology (2 Units)

 

Course description

This course is designed to impart an understanding of the organization of diverse physiological and endocrine systems that enable fish to flourish in diverse aqueous and marine environments. The course covers an overview of the systems responsible for the maintenance of homeostasis, and the sensory biology and the neuroendocrine system in illustrating how environmental signals are integrated and responded to. The knowledge is particularly important to the understanding of fish health in general.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • To define relationships between oxygen consumption and energy utilization
  • Illustrate the similarities and differences in specific physiological systems among

varying species.

  • Define the levels of integration among major physiological systems and explain

the coordination of molecular and cellular events through to whole animal level of

organization through evaluations on selected fish species

  • To describe how organisms interact with their environments and how

environmental conditions modulate physiological regulatory mechanisms

  • Explain the major neuroendocrine axes that modulate growth, reproduction, and

stress.

 

Course content

 

Ectothermy and endothermy in fishes. Sensory physiology of fishes: chemoreception, mechanoreception, electroreception, magnetoreception, thermoreception and photoreception. Aquatic respiration in crustaceans, molluscs and finfish:physiological implications of aquatic respiration. Aerial respiration in fishes. Circulatory systems in fishes: regulation of the cardiovascular system; digestive systems, endocrine systems: endocrine glands of finfish; mechanisms of hormone actions, reproduction. Excretory systems in fishes. Histological techniques in physiology. Applications of fish physiology and endocrinology to fisheries management and aquaculture.

 

Delivery: 15 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Block, B. A. (2005) Fish Physiology. Academic Press.
  2. Evans, D.H. and Claibourne, J.B. 2006. The Physiology of Fishes (3rd edition). CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, Boca Raton, FL
  3. Hoar, W.S. and Randall D.J. (1969) Fish Physiology. Vol 2: The Endocrine System. Academic Press, New York.
  4. Kime, D.E.(1998) Endocrine disruption in fish. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  5. Norris, D.O., and Carr, J.A. (2005) Endocrine Disruption. Oxford University Press. 4
  6. Sloman, K.A., Balshine, S and Wilson, R.W. (2005) Behaviour and Physiology of Fish. Academic Press.
  7. Yadav, B.N. (1995) Fish Endocrinology. Daya Publishing House.

 

AF 611: Environmental Impact of Aquaculture and Capture Fisheries(3 Units)

 

Course description

Water is a vital media and habitat for fish in aquaculture systems. Soil and water interactions affect the quality of water as a consequence affect aquaculture system health and services. The course brings together a number of activities which need to converge to minimise aquaculture's impact on the environment such as the need for planning, monitoring, modelling and husbandry. The course also highlights the potential for aquaculture to make a positive contribution to the environment. It also imparts knowledge on the responsible introduction of new species in pristine environments and gives knowledge on the effects of different gears used in the capture fisheries. The course prepares students to understand that aquaculture expansion may conflict with capture fisheries and other human activities requiring water and land.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Apply knowledge of ecological concepts and acquired abilities to analyse environmental questions.
  • Perform soil and water quality analysis and be able to use appropriate management in aquaculture.
  • Identify environmental problems, particularly those arising from aquaculture practices.
  • Apply acquired knowledge to foresee consequences of actions and suggest alternative proposals for the protection of the environment.
  • Describe the invasion mechanisms and the ecological and economic impacts of species introduction in fisheries and aquaculture.
  • have a basic understanding of the principles involved in assessment of environmental risks posed by the introduction of new compounds in aquaculture;
  • understand the role of environmental impact assessment and monitoring in environmental management;
  • understand the principles by which sampling programmes are designed, field samples are collected and processed and how data are stored and managed;
  • have a basic understanding of how to present and interpret spatially and temporally-related field data using a range of PC-based analytical software packages.

Course content

 

Soil and water interactions: Physico-chemical properties of soil and water. Productivity vs. water quality and quantity in soil and water, aquatic microorganism and their role in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulphur cycles and impact on aquatic habitats and species. Soil and Water quality monitoring and management: Fertilizers and manures used in aquaculture systems and ecological implication. Clay/pyrite soil, seepage, water treatment, water filtration devices, aeration, chlorination, aquatic weed management, water quality management in hatcheries, waste discharge standards, role of microorganisms in fish production, fish health and fish safety; microbial load, algal blooms and control.

Importance of fisheries and aquaculture: ecological and social aspects of aquaculture development. The concept of sustainability as it applies to the interrelationship between the environment, aquatic species (e.g. biology, health, and nutrition) and the culture of aquatic animal and plant species on a global level. Current practices of practical commercial production and changes and understanding needed to improve the sustainability of aquaculture: aquatic and near-shore ecosystem conservation, relationship with fisheries, animal health, water quality, fish nutrition (ingredients for aquaculture feeds).

Use of therapeutants in aquaculture (hazards of antibiotic use): transfer regulations (species introduction), culture practices, species selection, and others. Water quality. Genetic considerations of cultured/enhanced fish. Tropical fish trade (Environmental aquarist: should wild harvest continue).

Environmental compliance and monitoring: conditions that lead to invasion and introductions. Ballast water and other vectors ecological and economic consequences. Genetics of invasions; species-based mechanisms, ecosystem-based mechanisms. Traits of invaded ecosystems. Impacts: genetic pollution, economic impacts. Benefits, costs, tourism and recreation. Health impacts. Threat to global biodiversity. Risk assessment and Management. Biochemical and mechanical controls, case studies and international efforts.

 

Delivery:30 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Allendorf, F. W., 1991. Ecological and genetic effects of fish introductions: Synthesis and recommendations. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 48, 178-181.
  2. Barg, U.C. (1992) Guidelines for the promotion of environmental management of coastal aquaculture development. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper No. 328. Rome, FAO.
  3. Black, K.D. (2001) Environmental impacts of aquaculture. Sheffield Academic Press, UK.
  4. Bostick, K., Clay, J.W. and McNevin, A. (2005). Aquaculture and the Environment. A WWF Handbook on Production Practices Impacts, and Markets. WWF, USA.
  5. Boyd, C.E., (1990). Water Quality in Ponds for Aquaculture. Birmingham Publishing Company, Birmingham, Alabama.
  6. Drake, J.A. Mooney, H.A. di Castri, F. Groves, R.H. Kruger, F.J. Jejmarek, M. and Williamson, M. eds (1989) Biological Invasions, A global Perspective. John Wiley and Sons, Chichester, UK.
  7. Meade, J.W., (1990). Aquaculture Management, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York.
  8. Pullin, R.S.V. Rosenthal, H. and MacLean, J.L. (1993) Environment and aquaculture in developing countries. ICLARM Conference Proceedings (31): 359 pp.
  9. Rowland, S.J., (1992). Water Quality in Freshwater Aquaculture. Fishfacts 1. NSW Fisheries.
  10. Sandlund, O.T. Schei, P.J. and Viken, A. eds (1999) Invasive species and biodiversity Management, Kluwer Academic Publishers.

 

 

AF 612: Systematic Ichthyology(2 Units)

 

Course description

This course intends to teach students the fundamentals of fish taxonomy and the phylogenetic of major groups of fishes. The course will also teach different methods that are used in fish taxonomy.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Describe the fundamentals of fish taxonomy and the phylogenetic of major groups of fishes.
  • Perform the different taxonomic methods.
  • Identify different fish species.
  • Describe the geographical distribution of both living and extinct fishes.

 

Phylogenetic of major groups of fishes: a survey of extinct and living fishes of the world; phylogenetic methodology as applied to fishes, geographical distribution and historical zoogeography. Fish collection for systematic and faunistic research. Museums and research collections. Taxonomic methods: Morphology; external and internal features, photographing fish. Starch Gel Electrophoresis and species distinction. Chromosome preparation and analysis.

 

Delivery:15 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Jayaram, K.C. (2000) Fundamentals of Fish Taxonomy. Narendra Publishing House.
  2. Diogo, R. (2007) The Origin of Higher Clades: Osteology, Myology, Phylogeny and Evolution of Bony Fishes and the Rise of Tetrapods. Science Pub Inc.
  3. Stiassny, M. L. J. Parenti, L. R. and Johnson, G. D. (1996) Interrelationships of Fishes. Academic Press, San Diego.

 

 

AF 613: Ecology and Behaviour of Fishes(2 Units)

 

Course description

The course looks at fish Behaviour, migrations and considers the causes, types and significance of such behaviour, migrations, energetics, sensory physiology of orientation and navigation during migration. The course also considers the relevance of fish behaviour and migration to stocks management

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the ecology of fish, their behaviour and life histories.
  2. Explain the predator prey relationship in fish populations.
  3. Describe the nature and significance of fish migrations and its relevance to fish stock assessment management.

Course content

Fish behavioural ecology.

Predator-prey relationship: evolution of adaptive variation, learning interactions, conflicting demands. Foraging behaviour, static and dynamic foraging models in fish foraging, morphological influence on fish foraging behaviour. Resource defence.

Life histories and reproduction.

Behavioural organisation and the evolution of behavioural strategies: Response to fishing gear. Nature and significance of fish migrations; relevance of fish migration to stock assessment; energy required during migration and acquisition; sensory physiology of orientation and navigation; types of migration.

 

Delivery: 15 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Hart, P.J.B. and Reynolds J. D. (2002). Handbook of Fish Biology and Fisheries.
  2. Howes, G.J., (1997). Fish Migration and Exploitation in the Amazon. Columbia University Press
  3. Jennings, S. Kaiser, M. J. and Reynolds J. D. (2001). Marine Fisheries Ecology. Nature - Blackwell Science.
  4. Lucas, C.M. and Baras E., (2002). Migration of Freshwater Fishes. Blackwell Science Ltd. Oxford
  5. Nagelkerken, I. (Editor) (2009). Ecological Connectivity among Tropical Coastal Ecosystems. Springer, London.
  6. Reebs, S. (2001). Fish Behaviour in the Aquarium and in the Wild. Cornell University Press.
  7. Wootton, R.J. (1991). An introduction for advanced undergraduates and postgraduates in marine ecology, freshwater ecology, fish biology, fisheries ecology and aquaculture. Academic Publishers Group.

 

 

AF 614: Recreational and Ornamental Fisheries(2 Units)

 

Course description: This course intends to make students understand the potential of recreational and ornamental fisheries both economically and socially as well as the world status of ornamental fisheries and the market situation. The course also prepares students understand the characteristics of international trade in tropical aquarium fish, Market situation, trade structure and prospects in major importing countries. Students will also understand the licensing systems, marketing, liaison with importers, trade associations in importing countries.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Describe the potential of recreational and ornamental fisheries both economically (e.g. tourism) and socially.
  • Explain the world status of ornamental fisheries and the market situation.

 

Course content

Overview of world recreational fisheries.

Economics of recreational fisheries: recreational fishery and tourism.Recreational fishery policies. Recreational fishery and resource conservation.Conflicts related to recreational fisheries.World status of ornamental fisheries.Nature of ornamental fisheries. Environmental considerations.

Main characteristics of international trade in tropical aquarium fish: market situation, trade structure and prospects in major importing countries. Aquarium fish. Market situation. Trade structure and prospects in major importing countries. Aquarium fish breeding for export: handling and treatment, licensing, marketing, liaison with importers, trade associations, licensing systems in importing countries.

 

Delivery: 15 hours of lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References:

  1. Cato, J.C. and Brown, C.L. (2003) Marine Ornamental Species: Collection, Culture and Conservation. Wiley-Blackwell.
  2. Pitcher, T. and Hollingsworth, C. (2002) Recreational Fisheries. Ecological, Economic, and Social Evaluation. Blackwell Oxford.

 

 

AF 615: Aquatic Resources and Biodiversity Management(2 Units)

 

Course description

The course provides an understanding of scientific skills on aquatic resources and biodiversity management appropriate for the requirements of current and developing resource user needs. There is also a strong emphasis on biodiversity planning where reviews of the Convention on Biodiversity and policy implications at national and international levels are presented. The course also teaches students how to manage and solve current problems that our aquatic resources face.

 

Expected learning outcomes

At the end of the course the student should be able to:

  • Identify and describe core scientific skills on aquatic resources and biodiversity management appropriate for the requirements of current and developing resource user needs.
  • Be aware of the history of the Convention on Biodiversity, and its implementation national and international levels
  • Be able to develop and critically review biodiversity strategies for implementation at national and regional levels, with particular focus on sustainability of aquatic resources.
  • Manage and solve problems facing aquatic resources.
  • Describe principles of aquatic resources management.

 

Course content

Survey of aquatic resources.

Basic principles of management: the need for aquatic biodiversity conservation. Marine biodiversity and conservation: biodiversity exploitation, conservation policy, legislation and practice, biodiversity conventions. Recreational fishery management. Use of marine protected areas to enhance fish stocks.

 

Management of major resources: finfish, shellfish, pelagic stocks, coral reefs, mangroves, seagrasses and mineral resources. Current problems of aquatic resources management.

 

Delivery: 15 hours of Lectures and 45 hours of practical.

Assessment: Coursework 50%; final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Gautam, A. (1998) Conservation and Management of Aquatic Resources. Daya Pub. House.
  2. Greer, D. and Harvey, B.J. (2004) Blue Genes: Sharing and Conserving the World's Aquatic Biodiversity. Earthscan.
  3. Iversen, E.S. (1996) Living Marine Resources: Their Utilization and Management. Springer.
  4. Ntiba, M.J. Okemwa, E. and Sherman, K. (1998) Large Marine Ecosystems of the Indian Ocean: Assessment, Sustainability, and Management. Blackwell Publishing.
  5. Thieme, M.L. (2005) Freshwater Ecoregions of Africa and Madagascar: A Conservation Assessment. Island Press.

 

 

BL 607: Biostatistics(3 Units)

(From MSc (Appl. Zool.))

 

Course description

The course expose students to scientific skills andprotocols of research design, various sampling methods, a range of statistical methods for data analysis and testing including appropriate software and interpretation and presentation of data.

 

Expected learning outcomes

By the end of the course students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate statistical skills required to conduct research in the field of biology.
  2. Design, plan, conduct and report on biological investigation and data arising from them.

 

Course content

Methods of sampling and design. Collection and tabulation of primary and secondary data. Plotting frequency distribution, bar diagram, histograms, pie diagram, and cumulative frequency curves. Mean median, mode, quartiles and percentiles, variance, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, symmetry and measures of skewness and kurtosis. Correlation coefficient (r), interpretation of r, linear regression. Scatter plot, fitting of lines of regression, regression coefficient, and coefficient of determination. Chi-square test for independence. P-value of the statistic. Confidence limits One way and two-way analysis of variance. Non-parametric tests. Use of computer in-built statistical functions for computations of data and graphical tools for presentation of results.

 

Delivery: 30 Lectures and 45 hours of practical

Assessment: Course work 50%; Final examination 50%.

 

References

  1. Dear P. H. 2007. Bioinformatics.Scion Publishing Ltd.
  2. Ignacimuthu S.2001 Basic bioinformatics. Alpha Science International Ltd.
  3. Kothari, C. R. 2006.Research Methodology: methods and techniques. New Age International Publishers, New Delhi.
  4. Segel, I. H. 1976. Biochemical calculations. John Wiley & Sons.
  5. Stan Tsai C. 1996. Computational Biochemistry, John Wiley & Sons
  6. Zar, Z. H. 2004. Biostatistical analysis. Prentice Hall, New Jersey

 

 

BT 603: Seaweed Culture and Processing(3 Units)

(From MSc (Appl. Bot.))

 

Course description

This is a core course to all students pursuing M.Sc. Applied Botany programme. It covers various techniques used in macro algae (seaweed) culture and processing of products of commercial interest. Mode of delivery will involve lectures and intensive practical training in the field by practising various seaweed farming methods and techniques, laboratory experiments (culture under controlled conditions) and processing of raw material to obtain Phycocolloids (agar, carrageenan and alginates). Graduates of the course are expected to be potential entrepreneurs in seaweed and phycocolloids production industries.

Expected learning Outcomes

By the end of the course student should be able to:

  • Outline appropriate procedure for collection and maintenance of seed stock under controlled conditions
  • Account for the procedures for isolatingand propagating suitable strains of macroalgae
  • Describe the criteria for the suitable site for establishing macroalgae farm
  • Explain how to establish and manage macroalgae farms using appropriate techniques
  • Explain steps for processing algal raw material and obtaining phycocolloid of interest

Course content

An overview on algal classification and roles played by algae in human welfare: Cyanophytes, Chlorophytes, Phaeophytes, Rhodophytes; uses of algae and algal phycocolloids: as food for humans, examples of edible species, as supplement in animal feeds, as fertilizer in agriculture, roles in research, in medicine, as biofilters in integrated aquaculture, as source of commercially industrial important phycocolloids (agar, carrageenan and alginates). Uses of agar: examples of species used as sources of agar, application as thickener, stabilizer and gelling agent in food industries, application in pharmaceutical, biomedical and biotechnology. Uses of carrageenan: examples of species used as sources of carrageenan, application in dairy products, water-based foods, meat products, pet food, air freshener gels, toothpaste, immobilized biocatalysts. Uses of alginate: examples of species used as sources of alginate, application as thickener in textile printing and food industries, immobilized biocatalysts, pharmaceutical and medical uses, surface sizing in paper industries, binder for fish feed.

Seaweed farming: History; seaweed farming in Tanzania. Effect of environmental factors on algal productivity: substrate, temperature, salinity, light intensity, turbidity, water movement, fouling organisms and grazers.Selection of farm site; seed collection; seed stock maintenance; suitable strain selection; media and media preparation; farming techniques; in tanks, ponds, monoline/monofilament line, nets, raft; seeding, farm management; harvesting and post-harvest treatment. Impacts of seaweed farming on the environmental: substrate modification, seagrass and invertebrate destruction, mangrove clearing, introduction of alien species, socio-economic impacts.

Production and properties of phycocolloids: Agar production. Properties of agar. Carrageenan production: Procedure for semi-processed carrageenan. Properties of carrageenan. Alginate production: 1) the manufacture of sodium alginate by calcification process, 2) the manufacture of sodium alginate by alginic acid process. Properties of alginate.

 

Delivery mode: 30 Lectures and 45 hours of practical and fieldwork

Assessment: Course work 50%, Final Examination 50%

References

1.Felix S. (2007) Aquaculture Management Techniques ISBN: 9788185375410

2.Lobban, CS & Harrison, PJ (1994).Seaweed ecology and Physiology.Cambridge University Press. (ISBN 0-521-40334-0).

3.Graham, L.E & Wilcox, L.W. (2000). Algae.Prentice Hall. (ISBN 0-13-660 333-5).

4.Philip, S (1998). Biology of Algae. 3rd Edition. McGraw-Hill (ISBN 0-697-21910-0).

5.Robert Anderson (Editor) (2005). Algal Culturing Techniques. Elsevier, ISBN 9780080456508

 

 

SC 601: Advanced Research Methods(3 Units)

(From MSc (Appl. Zool.))

 

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to teach students advanced research methods. The course exposes students to scientific skills and protocols of research design and various sampling methods. The course also teaches students various techniques used in report and scientific papers writing.

 

Expected Learning outcomes

  • At the end of the course the student should be able to:
  • Identify an appropriate research problem.
  • Plan, design, implement and execute a research.
  • Design and write technical reports, dissertations and scientific papers.

 

Course Content

An introduction to research methodologies: meaning; objectives, types and significance of research. Methods versus methodology. Defining the research problem: selecting the problem, necessity of defining the problem. Research design; meaning of research design features and related concepts. Basic principles of experimental design and statistical application. Sampling fundamentals. Sampling design: census and sample survey; implications of a sample design; steps in sampling design; criteria for selecting a sampling procedure. Sampling program and measurements and description of dispersion. Absolute population estimates using capture-recapture experiments. Computer application of software support for experimental design. Measurement and scaling techniques, methods of data collection, processing and analysis of data; statistical methods. Testing hypothesis. Interpretation and report writing. Methods in Qualitative research; when to use qualitative methods and choice of design; the interview techniques and case study methods. Fieldwork and nature of qualitative data. Analysis and interpretation of qualitative data. Issues of validity and reliability of qualitative data. Research proposal writing and presentation.

 

Delivery Mode: 30 hours lectures and 45 hours of practicals

Assessment: Coursework 100%

 

References:

  1. Babbie, E.R. (2004) The Practice of Social Research (10th Edition). Thomson-Wadsworth Publ. Co.
  2. Dytham, C. (2003) Choosing and Using Statistics (2nd Edition). Blackwell Publishing.
  3. Fisher, R.A. (1990) Statistical Methods, Experimental Design and Scientific Inference. Oxford Uni. Press.
  4. Goodwin, G.C. and Payne, R.L. (1977) Process System identification and Experimental Design and Data Analysis. Academic Press.
  5. Kothari, C. R. 2006.Research Methodology: methods and techniques. New Age Int. Publ., New Delhi.
  6. Rosner, Bernard. 1995. Fundamentals of Biostatistics. Duxbury Press, Wadsworth Publ. Co., Belmont.
  7. Rozenzweig, Michael, L. 1995. Species Diversity in Space and Time. Cambridge University Press.
  8. Southwood, T.R.E. and Henderson, P.A. (2000) Ecological Methods (3rd Edition). Blackwell Science.
  9. Zar, J.H. (2007) Biostatistical Analysis (5th Edition). Prentice Hall.

 


APPENDIX 2: LIST OF ACADEMIC STAFF AND THEIR AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

 

List of course lecturers

 

Core courses

Course code

Units

Course Title

Lecturer

AF 601

3

Advanced Aquatic Ecology

Dr. D. Shilla + Dr. C. Lugomela + Dr. S. Semesi

AF 602

2

Fisheries Soci-economics and Management

Dr. P. Onyango + Prof. Y. Mgaya

AF 603

3

Fish Population Dynamics and Stock Assessment

Dr. B.L. Benno + Dr. Kamukuru

AF 604

3

Advanced Aquaculture Systems

Prof. P. Bwathondi & Dr. R.A. Tamatamah

AF 605

3

Fish Nutrition and Feed Technology

Prof. P.O.J. Bwathondi & Dr. C. Mwita

AF 606

3

Aquafarm Planning and Management

Dr. P. Onyango + Dr. R. Tamatamah

AF 607

2

Fish Health Protection

Dr. C. Mwita

AF 608

3

Broodstock Management and Hatchery Management

Prof. P.O.J. Bwathondi & Prof. Y.D. Mgaya

AF 609

3

Post Harvest Technology in Fisheries

Dr. C. Mwita + Dr. S. Ndaro +Dr. Ngoile.

AF 699

6

Dissertation

ALL

 

Elective courses

 

Course code

Units

Course Title

Lecturer

AF 610

2

Fish Physiology and Endocrinology

Dr. H. Pratap + Dr. A. Kamukuru

AF 611

3

Environmental Impact of Aquaculture and Capture Fisheries

Dr. R. Tamatamah + Prof. Y. Mgaya

AF 612

2

Systematic Ichthyology

Dr. A.T. Kamukuru

AF 613

2

Ecology and Behaviour of Fishes

Dr. B.R. Lugendo

AF 614

2

Recreational and Ornamental Fisheries

Dr. B.L. Benno + Dr. S. Ndaro

AF 615

2

Aquatic Resources and Biodiversity Management

Prof. J.F. Machiwa & Dr. B. Lugendo

BL 607

3

Biostatistics

Dr. Nyundo + Dr. P. Mfilinge + Dr. Magige

BT 603

3

Seaweed Culture and Processing

Dr. Buriyo

SC 601

3

Advanced Research Methods

Dr. F. Magige

 

List of academic staff and their areas of specialization

 

 

S/N

Department

Name

Qualification

Area(s) of expertise

1.

DASF

Prof. Y.D. Mgaya

PhD

Aquaculture and Fisheries

2.

 

DASF

Prof. J. F. Machiwa

 

PhD

Environmental Biogeochemistry

3.

 

DASF

Prof. P.O.J. Bwathondi

 

PhD

Aquaculture

4.

 

DASF

Dr. C. Lugomela

 

PhD

Plankton Ecology

5.

DASF

 

Dr. R. A. Tamatamah

PhD

 

Aquaculture and Watershed Management

6.

 

DASF

Dr. S.G.M. Ndaro

 

PhD

 

Benthic Ecology

7.

 

DASF

Dr. A.T. Kamukuru

 

PhD

Fisheries Biology and Management

8.

 

DASF

Dr. J. Francis

 

PhD

 

Physical Oceanography

9.

 

DASF

Dr. B. R. Lugendo

 

PhD

 

Marine and Fish Ecology

10

 

DASF

Dr. B. L. Benno

 

PhD

Fisheries Ecology and Management

11.

 

DASF

Dr. C. Mwita

 

PhD

Fish Parasitology

12.

 

DASF

Dr. D. Shilla

 

PhD

Environmental Science/Aquatic Ecology and Ecotoxicology

13.

 

DASF

Dr. P. Mfillinge

 

PhD

Limnology and Estuarine Ecology

14.

 

DASF

Dr. I. S. Semesi

 

PhD

Mangrove and Coral Reef Ecology

15.

 

DASF

Dr. P. Onyango

 

PhD

 

Fisheries Socio-economics

16.

 

BOTANY

Dr. A. Buriyo

 

PhD

Algal Ecology and Systematics

17.

 

ZOOLOGY

Dr. F. Magige

 

PhD

 

Wildlife Conservation

18.

 

ZOOLOGY

Dr. B. A. Nyundo

 

PhD

 

Entomology, Biostatistics

 

 

Aquatic